Cardboard-made ‘anti-sex’ beds provided to athletes to prevent intimacy at the Tokyo Games village has triggered a plethora of reactions online, with many calling them ‘bizarre’and some supported it. As American track and field athlete and 2016  5,000 metre Olympic silver medallist Paul Chelimo pointed out on Twitter, the beds are made of cardboard and are able to “withstand the weight of a single person to avoid situations beyond sports.”Cardboard-made ‘anti-sex’ beds provided to athletes to prevent intimacy at the Tokyo Games village has triggered a plethora of reactions online, with many calling them ‘bizarre’and some supported it.  

 As American track and field athlete and 2016  5,000 metre Olympic silver medallist Paul Chelimo pointed out on Twitter, the beds are made of cardboard and are able to “withstand the weight of a single person to avoid situations beyond sports.”Cardboard-made ‘anti-sex’ beds provided to athletes to prevent intimacy at the Tokyo Games village has triggered a plethora of reactions online, with many calling them ‘bizarre’and some supported it. As American track and field athlete and 2016  5,000 metre Olympic silver medallist Paul Chelimo pointed out on Twitter, the beds are made of cardboard and are able to “withstand the weight of a single person to avoid situations beyond sports.”In the following tweet, Chelimo also joked about people, who pee in their sleep, to be at “risk” on the cardboard beds. “At this point I will have to start practicing how to sleep on the floor; cause If my bed collapses and I have no training on sleeping on the floor I’m done.” 

Athletes were warned to avoid close contact with others and to avoid using the free, branded condoms that are given out as an Olympic tradition during the Games. This particular tradition has been in effect since 1988 and is to encourage safe sex amongst the athletes while they live in a closely confined space for weeks.The organisers of the Games say that athletes should take the condoms home, though, in an attempt to raise awareness for HIV and Aids. Earlier today, two South Africa footballers became the first competitors to test positive for coronavirus  just five days before the start of the Olympic Games. According to the BBC, South Africa's Football Association confirmed Thabiso Monyane and Kamohelo Mahlatsi as the cases.


 

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